Prince Edward Island farmers turned in 27,320 kilograms of obsolete pesticides last year

February 15, 2012 – Etobicoke, ON – Prince Edward Island farmers lined up to return their unwanted or obsolete pesticides last year, turning in more than 27,000 kilograms of product.

“This number is significant,” says Barry Friesen, general manager of Cleanfarms. “The success of this collection just reaffirms the commitment of PEI farmers to environmental responsibility.”

The program was operated by Cleanfarms, a national industry-led agricultural waste management organization. Cleanfarms partnered with three agri-retailers – PEI Agromart, Cavendish Agri Services and McCain Produce – who collected the obsolete pesticides at their locations. The collection took place over a two-week period in November.

“Farmers want a safe and environmentally responsible way to dispose of their old or unwanted pesticides and this program gives them just that,” says Friesen.

Since 1998, Prince Edward Island farmers have returned more than 69,000 kilograms of obsolete pesticides. After collection, the pesticides are taken to a licensed waste management facility where they are safely disposed of.

“The program offered by Cleanfarms provides an environmentally sustainable way for PEI farmers to dispose of unused or out of date pesticides. PEI farmers value the service and have used it to dispose of thousands of kilograms of pesticides. This is an excellent tool that provides us with a practical way to manage pesticides on farm,” says John Jamieson, executive director, PEI Federation of Agriculture.

The obsolete pesticide collection program generally comes to the province every three years or so. Farmers should safely store their unwanted pesticides until they can properly dispose of them through the obsolete pesticide collection program.

For more information, visit www.cleanfarms.ca.

Industry developing solutions to manage agricultural waste plastics in Saskatchewan

January 16, 2012 – The Government of Saskatchewan has partnered with Cleanfarms to develop an appropriate way to manage on-farm plastic waste, such as bale wrap and grain bags, in an effort to reduce the environmental footprint of farming in the province.

As it currently stands, there are either limited or no recycling options for many agricultural plastic waste products in Saskatchewan.

“We know that farmers are more than willing to participate in stewardship programs where they exist; they want to do the right thing. Cleanfarms currently operates a national empty pesticide container recycling program and an obsolete pesticide collection program, both of which have very high participation rates,” says Barry Friesen, general manager of Cleanfarms.

The challenge Prairie farmers have managing their plastic grain bags has been well documented as of late.

“We are pleased to see industry, government and the broader stakeholder community work together to develop a recycling program for farmers,” Saskatchewan Environment Minister Dustin Duncan said.

Cleanfarms recently did a study of the agricultural waste stewardship programs in the province. The research revealed that the most successful programs had government legislation mandating participation such as those to manage used oil, oil filters and their containers, tires, paint and electronics.

The Government of Saskatchewan has tasked Cleanfarms with bringing together stakeholders to develop the framework for a program to recycle agricultural plastics such as bale wrap, twine and grain bags.

“Saskatchewan is an innovative province that is well positioned to become a leader in agricultural plastics recycling,” says Friesen. “In many cases, the technology is already in place. Bridon Corage, a highly successful twine manufacturer with a plant in the province, is currently making new twine out of used twine.”

Cleanfarms led a consultation with industry stakeholders today, which will help guide its work going forward. Its recommendations on a potential program structure will be ready for the Ministry of Environment by early spring of this year.

About Cleanfarms

Cleanfarms is one of Canada’s leading agricultural waste management organizations. It currently operates a national empty pesticide container collection program and an obsolete pesticide collection campaign. To learn more, visit www.cleanfarms.ca.

Cleanfarms to develop program to manage agricultural plastic waste in Ontario

Jan 5 , 2012 – A new service for farmers who want to safely get rid of plastic agricultural waste, including bale wrap, will be piloted in 2012 in the Lake Simcoe watershed by Cleanfarms, a national, industry-led stewardship organization.

“This pilot project will lay the groundwork for a comprehensive program to responsibly manage all agricultural waste plastic across the province,” says Barry Friesen, general manager of Cleanfarms.

According to recent research conducted by Cleanfarms, farmers in Ontario generate more than 14,000 tonnes of non-nutrient based waste on their farms each year.

While there are stewardship programs in place for some agricultural waste products, there are many products for which no recycling options exist.

“Farmers don’t want to burn waste or send it to landfills but it’s difficult for them to be good stewards when there aren’t programs in place to help them,” says Friesen. “Where there are programs in place, farmers overwhelmingly choose to participate. The success of Cleanfarms’ empty pesticide container recycling program is a prime example.”

The pilot program in Lake Simcoe is being funded by the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs.

“I congratulate the folks at Cleanfarms for working with us to pilot this service that will help farmers better protect our environment,” said Minister of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs Ted McMeekin.

Cleanfarms’ empty pesticide container recycling program has been in operation since 1989 and its obsolete pesticide collection program began in 1998. Both have earned a reputation for being among the best agricultural stewardship programs in the world.

Funding for this program comes from the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs through the Canada-Ontario Agreement Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem. The Canadian Animal Health Institute and industry have pledged additional cash and in-kind contributions.

Farmers turn in more than 22,000 kilograms of obsolete pesticides in British Columbia

Nov. 16, 2011 – Ottawa, ON – Farmers from Vancouver Island and the Fraser Valley turned in more than 22,000 kilograms of unwanted or obsolete agricultural pesticides this fall, bringing the total amount of product collected by Cleanfarms, previously under CropLife Canada, in British Columbia since 1998 to more than 207,000 kilograms.

“We’re extremely pleased with the results of this collection campaign,” says Barry Friesen, general manager of Cleanfarms, a national, industry-led stewardship organization that co-funded the program in B.C. “B.C. producers made a strong statement that they are committed to environmental responsibility on their farms.”

Cleanfarms partnered with the BC Agriculture Council (BCAC), through the Agriculture Environment and Wildlife Fund of the BC Investment Agriculture Foundation, to fund and operate this year’s program.

“B.C. farmers want to dispose of their unwanted or old pesticides in a safe and environmentally responsible way, and we’re pleased to help facilitate that through this program,” says Greg Norton, Chair of the BCAC Agriculture Environment Initiatives Management Committee.

The British Columbia obsolete pesticide collection campaign ran between Oct. 4 and Oct. 20 at five drop-off locations with participating municipalities and ag-retailers across Vancouver Island and the Fraser Valley. More than 3,900 kilograms of product was collected on Vancouver Island and more than 18,000 kilograms in the Fraser Valley region.

All of the obsolete pesticides were taken to a licensed disposal facility where they are disposed of through high temperature incineration.

This program comes at no cost to farmers and is the plant science industry’s commitment to the full life-cycle stewardship of its products. “Protecting the environment takes commitment and collaboration between industry and the farm community. This program is a prime example of the success we can achieve on this front when both groups work together,” says Friesen.

The obsolete pesticide collection program will return again next fall where it will collect unwanted pesticides from producers in the Okanagan, Interior and Peace regions of the province.

Cleanfarms also operates an empty pesticide container recycling program across the country and is currently looking at ways to manage other on-farm agricultural waste products.

For more information on Cleanfarms’ waste management initiatives, please visit www.Cleanfarms.ca.

Obsolete pesticide collection campaign comes to southern Saskatchewan

October 24, 2011 – Ottawa, ON – As fall sets in and another harvesting season comes to a close, farmers are being invited to safely and responsibly dispose of their unwanted or obsolete agricultural pesticides.

Southern Saskatchewan agricultural producers can drop off their unwanted pesticides at one of 18 collection locations over a three-day period between October 25 and 27.

The collection program is operated by Cleanfarms, an industry-led national not-for-profit agricultural waste management organization. A similar program will be offered in northern Saskatchewan in 2012.

“Cleanfarms is committed to providing programs to collect unwanted or obsolete agricultural pesticides in an environmentally responsible way, at no cost to farmers,” says Barry Friesen, general manager of Cleanfarms.

Saskatchewan farmers have a long history of good stewardship practices. Since 1998 they’ve returned more than 280,459 kilograms of obsolete pesticides. After collection, the pesticides are taken to a licensed waste management facility where they are disposed of through high temperature incineration.

“We know that farmers care a lot about the environment. This becomes abundantly clear when we see their participation rates in programs like the obsolete pesticide collection program as well as our empty pesticide container recycling program,” says Friesen.

Farmers are invited to return all of their obsolete or unwanted agricultural pesticides in a secure container with the product label attached. This program is strictly for agricultural pesticides; adjuvents, fertilizers, treated seed, paint, solvents and domestic pesticides will not be accepted.

Collections will take place at the following locations from October 25 – 27:

  • Assiniboia, Viterra
  • Balcarres, Cargill
  • Central Butte, Hawks Agro
  • Estevan, Richardson Pioneer
  • Indian Head, Viterra
  • Kindersley, Cargill
  • Mankota, Viterra
  • Maple Creek, Viterra
  • Melville, Viterra
  • Moose Jaw, Cargill
  • Regina, Viterra
  • Redvers, Advantage Coop
  • Shaunavon, Shaunavon Coop
  • Strasbourg, Richardson Pioneer
  • Swift Current, Viterra
  • Weyburn, Weyburn Inland Terminal
  • Whitewood, Richardson Pioneer
  • Yorkton, CargillFor more information, visit www.cleanfarms.ca. For media inquiries, please contact:Erin O’Hara 613-230-9881 oharae@croplife.ca

Obsolete pesticide collection campaign comes to the Fraser Valley

October 11, 2011 ‐ Ottawa, ON – Farmers in the Fraser Valley region can safely and responsibly dispose of their unwanted or obsolete agricultural pesticides at one of two locations.

Cleanfarms, an industry‐led national not‐for‐profit agricultural waste management organization, is heading the collection campaign, which will take place in two locations across the Fraser Valley beginning today. Collections took place in the Vancouver Island region earlier in the month.

“Cleanfarms is committed to providing programs to collect unwanted or obsolete agricultural pesticides in an environmentally responsible way, at no cost to farmers,” says Barry Friesen, general manager of Cleanfarms.

British Columbia farmers have demonstrated their commitment to good stewardship over the years. Since 1998 they’ve returned more than 185,000 kilograms of obsolete pesticides in B.C. After collection, the pesticides are taken to a licensed waste management facility where they are disposed of through high temperature incineration.

Co‐funders of the program, the BC Agriculture Council (BCAC), through the Agriculture Environment and Wildlife Fund of the BC Investment Agriculture Foundation, welcomed the opportunity to participate in this initiative.

“We’re pleased to support and be part of this program as it offers a tremendous service to farmers and plays an important role in protecting the environment for all British Columbians,” says Greg Norton, Chair of the BCAC Agriculture Environment Initiatives Management Committee.

Farmers are invited to return all of their obsolete or unwanted agricultural pesticides in a secure container with the label attached. This program is strictly for agricultural pesticides; adjuvents, treated seed, paint, solvents and domestic pesticides will not be accepted.

Collections will take place at the following locations and dates:

  • October 11 & 12 – Agrium Advanced Technologies (formerly Evergro Canada Inc.), Delta
  • October 19 & 20 – Abbotsford Mission Recycling Depot, Abbotsford All collection locations will be open from 10 am to 4 pm.
    For more information, visit www.cleanfarms.ca.
    For media inquiries, please contact:Erin O’Hara 613‐230‐9881 oharae@croplife.caGrace Cho

604‐847‐3698

Communications@bcac.bc.ca

Agricultural Pesticide Collection Available

August 10, 2009 – Farmers in the Peace River region will have an opportunity to easily dispose of any obsolete or unwanted pesticides later this month, thanks to a five-day Cleanfarms TM collection program co-sponsored by industry and government.

The program, which is free of charge to farmers, will take place August 24 – 28 with drop-off locations at Viterra ag-retailers in Dawson Creek and Fort St. John.

“The Obsolete Pesticide Collection Campaign gives farmers the opportunity to safely dispose of outdated, unwanted or otherwise obsolete agricultural pesticides,” said Lorne Hepworth, president of CropLife Canada. “Since 1998 our program has disposed of over 2.5 million kilograms of unwanted pesticides across Canada.”

The obsolete pesticide collection program is an industry-led stewardship program aimed at collecting and safely disposing obsolete agricultural pesticides. This year’s British Columbia program is co-sponsored by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, BC Ministry of Environment, Environment Canada, BC Ministry of Agriculture and Lands, BC Agriculture Council, Investment Agriculture Foundation of BC and Health Canada.

“The pesticide collection program is a great way for the BC Peace agricultural producers to dispose of obsolete or unwanted agricultural pesticides,” stated Martin Moore, director from the BC Grain Producers Association. “Changes in crops and crop production methods may result in pesticides being unusable. The pesticide collection program ensures the products are taken care of in a safe and environmentally responsible manner.”

Products will be accepted at 10684 – 213 Road in Dawson Creek and 9704 78th St in Fort St. John. Pesticide products that will be accepted include agricultural herbicides, insecticides, fungicides and rodenticides. Other products will not be accepted.

For more information please contact:

Nadine Sisk

Director, Media Relations 613-230-9881 siskn@croplife.ca

Lynn Lashuk

Agriculture Environment Initiatives 250-860-2967
Lynn@ardcorp.ca