Farmers asked to return their empty seed and pesticide bags

Etobicoke, ON, May 4, 2016 – CleanFARMS, an agricultural waste stewardship organization, is encouraging Ontario farmers to return empty seed and pesticide bags after they have finished planting this spring.

“Ontario farmers have been returning empty pesticide and fertilizer containers for decades. Now they can add empty seed and pesticide bags to the list of things they can divert from the landfill,” said Barry Friesen, general manager of CleanFARMS.

This project is part of the agricultural industry’s commitment to the responsible management of its products throughout their entire lifecycle and applies to all seed and pesticide bags. Like other CleanFARMS programs, the empty seed and pesticide bag program is run with no extra charge to farmers.

Once bags are returned to ag-retailers or seed dealers, CleanFARMS collects them and transports them to energy-conversion facilities with extensive emission controls.

“Free collection bags are available at Ontario retailers right now,” Friesen said. “Once a farmer is finished with a seed or pesticide bag, they need to make sure the bag is completely empty, place it in the collection bag and return it the next time they head to a participating retailer. It’s a simple process that can make a big difference for our environment.”

Collections take place from May to September and a full list of collection sites can be found at CleanFARMS.ca.

CleanFARMS is a not-for-profit industry stewardship organization committed to environmental responsibility through the proper management of agricultural waste. For a list of all programs, visit Cleanfarms.ca.

For more information, please visit www.cleanfarms.ca.

For more information, please contact:
Jillian Bender, media relations
(613) 230-9881 x 3228 | media@cleanfarms.ca

B.C. farmers return more than 28,000 kilograms of obsolete pesticides and livestock medications

March 17, 2016, Vancouver, B.C. – Farmers in British Columbia turned in 27,672 kilograms of obsolete and unwanted pesticides, and 349 kilograms of livestock and equine medications through CleanFARMS’ obsolete collection campaign in 2015.

Collections took place at 10 participating ag-retail and municipal locations in the Okanagan, Kootenay and Interior regions of the province from October 20 – November 5, 2015. This is the fourth collection program CleanFARMS, a national, industry-led waste stewardship organization, has run in the province.

This marked the first time that a combined collection of pesticides and livestock medications has been offered in these regions of B.C. CleanFARMS partnered with the Canadian Animal Health Institute (CAHI) to add the collection of livestock and equine medications to CleanFARMS’ existing program.

“Farmers are keen to responsibly manage waste on their farms. This program gives them the opportunity to safely and responsibly return unused products. The British Columbia Agricultural Council (BCAC) is proud to support this industry-led program that supports sustainable agriculture,” said Stan Vander Waal, chair of BCAC.

Farmers in B.C. have a long history of good stewardship practices. Since 1998, B.C. farmers have turned in more than 254,000 kilograms of obsolete pesticides – which is a testament to their environmental commitment.

“This year’s collection was a great success thanks to the commitment of B.C. farmers and participating collection sites,” said Barry Friesen, CleanFARMS’ general manager. “B.C. farmers’ continued dedication to the obsolete collections program proves their commitment to protecting the environment and making responsible decisions on the farm.”

The obsolete collection program is generally delivered in each province or region of the country every three years and comes at no cost to farmers. The program will be delivered in the Fraser Valley and Vancouver Island regions of B.C. in the fall of 2017. In between collections, farmers are encouraged to safely store their unwanted pesticides and livestock medications until they can properly dispose of them through the program.

The obsolete collection program is part of the plant science and animal health industry’s commitment to the responsible lifecycle management of their products.

For more information, please visit www.cleanfarms.ca.

For more information, please contact:
Jillian Bender, media relations
(613) 230-9881 x 3228 | media@cleanfarms.ca

Nova Scotia farmers return more than 10,000 kilograms of obsolete pesticides and livestock medications

March 14, 2016, Halifax, N.S. – Farmers in Nova Scotia returned 9,789 kilograms of obsolete and unwanted pesticides and 305 kilograms of livestock and equine medications through CleanFARMS’ obsolete collection campaign in 2015.

CleanFARMS, which operates the program, is a national, industry-led agricultural waste stewardship organization. Collections took place at 12 participating ag-retail locations throughout Nova Scotia from November 2–13. This is the fourth collection program CleanFARMS has run in the province.

This marked the first time that a combined collection of pesticides and livestock medications has been offered in Nova Scotia. CleanFARMS partnered with the Canadian Animal Health Institute (CAHI) to add the collection of livestock and equine medications to CleanFARMS’ existing obsolete pesticide collection program.

“The CleanFARMS collection program provides farmers with an environmentally responsible way to dispose of unused or expired pesticides and livestock medications,” said Chris van den Heuvel, president of the Nova Scotia Federation of Agriculture. “Farmers in Nova Scotia are committed to protecting the environment and the high number of participants is just another example of our efforts.”

Nova Scotia farmers have a long history of good stewardship practices. Since 1998, Nova Scotia farmers have returned more than 54,000 kilograms of obsolete pesticides. “We are pleased with the success of this program in Nova Scotia,” said Barry Friesen, CleanFARMS’ general manager. “Nova Scotia farmers’ continued dedication to the obsolete collection program proves their commitment to protecting the environment and making responsible decisions on the farm.”

The obsolete collection program is generally delivered in each province or region of the country every three years and comes at no cost to farmers. The program will return to Nova Scotia in fall 2018. In between collections, farmers are encouraged to safely store their unwanted pesticides and livestock medications until they can properly dispose of them through the program.

The obsolete collection program is part of the plant science and animal health industry’s commitment to the responsible lifecycle management of their products.

For more information, please visit www.cleanfarms.ca.

For more information, please contact:
Jillian Bender, media relations
(613) 230-9881 x 3228 | media@cleanfarms.ca

Saskatchewan farmers safely dispose of more than 91,000 kilograms of obsolete pesticides and livestock medications

Saskatoon, SK

Farmers in Saskatchewan returned 89,832 kilograms of obsolete and unwanted pesticides and 1,289 kilograms of livestock and equine medications through CleanFARMS’ obsolete collection campaign this year.

CleanFARMS, which operates the program, is a national, industry-led agricultural waste stewardship organization. Collections took place at 20 participating ag-retail locations throughout the northern half of Saskatchewan from October 5-9, 2015. This is the fourth collection program CleanFARMS has run in the province.

This marked the first time that a combined collection of pesticides and livestock medications has been offered in the northern region of Saskatchewan. CleanFARMS partnered with the Canadian Animal Health Institute (CAHI) to offer the collection of livestock and equine medications to CleanFARMS’ existing program.

“Saskatchewan farmers care about the environment and are keen to responsibly manage waste from their farms,” said Norm Hall, president of the Agricultural Producers Association of Saskatchewan (APAS). “CleanFARMS provides a one-stop service to safely manage unused or expired pesticides and livestock medications.”

Saskatchewan farmers have a long history of good stewardship practices and have been participating in the obsolete collections program since 1999 – which is a testament to their environmental commitment. The program last came to northern Saskatchewan in 2012, when more than 60,000 kilograms of product was collected from farmers and safely disposed of.

“This year’s collection was a great success thanks to the commitment of Saskatchewan farmers and participating ag-retail collection sites,” said Barry Friesen, CleanFARMS’ general manager. “CleanFARMS is proud to offer collection programs that ensure unwanted and obsolete pesticides, as well as livestock and equine medications, can be disposed of in an environmentally responsible way.”

The obsolete collection program is generally delivered in each province or region of the country every three years and comes at no cost to farmers. The program will be delivered in the southern half of Saskatchewan in the fall of 2017. In between collections, farmers are encouraged to safely store their unwanted pesticides and livestock medications until they can properly dispose of them through the program.

The obsolete collection program is part of the plant science and animal health industry’s commitment to the responsible lifecycle management of their products.
For more information, please visit www.cleanfarms.ca.

For more information, please contact:

Jillian Bender, media relations
(613) 230-9881 x 3228 | media@cleanfarms.ca

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New Brunswick farmers return more than 15,000 kilograms of obsolete pesticides and livestock medications

March 2, 2016, Saint John, N.B. – Farmers in New Brunswick returned 15,019 kilograms of obsolete and unwanted pesticides and 330 kilograms of livestock and equine medications through CleanFARMS’ obsolete collection campaign in 2015.

CleanFARMS, which operates the program, is a national, industry-led agricultural waste stewardship organization. Collections took place at eleven participating ag-retail locations throughout New Brunswick from November 2–13. This is the fourth collection program CleanFARMS has run in the province.

This marked the first time that a combined collection of pesticides and livestock medications has been offered in New Brunswick. CleanFARMS partnered with the Canadian Animal Health Institute (CAHI) to add the collection of livestock and equine medications to CleanFARMS’ existing program.

“The CleanFARMS collection program provides farmers with an environmentally responsible way to dispose of unused or expired pesticides and livestock medications,” said Mike Bouma, president of the Agricultural Alliance of New Brunswick (AANB). “AANB is proud to support this industry-led program that supports sustainable agriculture.”

New Brunswick farmers have a long history of good stewardship practices. Since 1998, New Brunswick farmers have returned more than 45,000 kilograms of obsolete pesticides. “We are pleased with the success of this program in New Brunswick,” said Barry Friesen, CleanFARMS’ general manager. “New Brunswick farmers’ continued dedication to the obsolete collection program proves their commitment to protecting the environment and making responsible decisions on the farm.”

The obsolete collection program is generally delivered in each province or region of the country every three years and comes at no cost to farmers. The program will return to New Brunswick in fall 2018. In between collections, farmers are encouraged to safely store their unwanted pesticides and livestock medications until they can properly dispose of them through the program.

The obsolete collection program is part of the plant science and animal health industry’s commitment to the responsible lifecycle management of their products.

For more information, please visit www.cleanfarms.ca.

For more information, please contact:
Jillian Bender, media relations
(613) 230-9881 x 3228 | media@cleanfarms.ca

Alberta farmers safely dispose of more than 72,000 kilograms of obsolete pesticides and livestock medications

February 29, 2016, Calgary, A.B. – Farmers in Alberta returned 70,737 kilograms of obsolete and unwanted pesticides and 2,162 kilograms of livestock and equine medications through CleanFARMS’ obsolete collection campaign this year.

CleanFARMS, which operates the program, is a national, industry-led agricultural waste stewardship organization. Collections took place at 20 participating ag-retail locations throughout the southern half of Alberta from October 26-30, 2015. This is the third collection program CleanFARMS has run in the province.

This marked the first time that a combined collection of pesticides and livestock medications has been offered in Alberta. CleanFARMS partnered with the Canadian Animal Health Institute (CAHI) to add the collection of livestock and equine medications to CleanFARMS’ existing obsolete pesticide collection program.

“The members of the Canadian Animal Health Institute were pleased to participate in this important program. It demonstrates our industry’s commitment to safely managing animal medications throughout their lifecycle,” said Jean Szkotnicki, president of CAHI. “We were pleased to partner with CleanFARMS by providing Saskatchewan’s livestock and equine community with this service.”

Alberta farmers have a long history of good stewardship practices and have been participating in the obsolete collections program since 1999 – which is a testament to their environmental commitment. The program last came to southern Alberta in 2012, when more than 66,000 kilograms of product was collected from farmers and safely disposed of.

“This year’s collection was a great success thanks to the commitment of Alberta farmers and participating ag-retail collection sites,” said Barry Friesen, CleanFARMS’ general manager. “CleanFARMS is proud to offer collection programs that ensure unwanted and obsolete pesticides, as well as livestock and equine medications, can be disposed of in an environmentally responsible way.”

The obsolete collection program is generally delivered in each province or region of the country every three years and comes at no cost to farmers. The program will be delivered in the northern half of Alberta in the fall of 2016. In between collections, farmers are encouraged to safely store their unwanted pesticides and livestock medications until they can properly dispose of them through the program.

The obsolete collection program is part of the plant science and animal health industry’s commitment to the responsible lifecycle management of their products.

For more information, please visit www.cleanfarms.ca.

For more information, please contact:
Jillian Bender, media relations
(613) 230-9881 x 3228 | media@cleanfarms.ca