P.E.I. farmers invited to safely dispose of their obsolete pesticides and livestock medications

November 3, 2014, Charlottetown, PE – Farmers in Prince Edward Island are invited to safely and responsibly dispose of their unwanted or obsolete pesticides and livestock (including equine) medications from November 3 until 14.

Cleanfarms, an industry-led, national not-for-profit agricultural waste management organization, in partnership with the Canadian Animal Health Institute (CAHI), is offering this program, which comes at no charge to farmers, this fall.

“P.E.I. farmers value stewardship and are pleased to partner with Cleanfarms to safely dispose of on-farm materials,” says John Jamieson, Executive Director, PEI Federation of Agriculture. “This one-stop collection program provides a wonderful service to farmers and significantly benefits all of Prince Edward Island by helping protect its environment.”

P.E.I. farmers have a long history of good stewardship practices. Since 1998, P.E.I. farmers have returned more than 69,000 kilograms of obsolete pesticides. In 2012 alone, they turned in more than 27,000 kilograms of product, which reaffirmed P.E.I. farmers’ commitment to environmental responsibility. This year is the first time in P.E.I. that livestock and equine medications have been added to the program.

“This number is significant,” says Barry Friesen, general manager of Cleanfarms. “We are so pleased with the success of this program in P.E.I. in the past as it reaffirms the commitment of P.E.I. farmers to environmental responsibility.”

After collection, the pesticides and medications are taken to a licensed waste management facility where they are disposed of through high temperature incineration.

The following locations will be accepting obsolete pesticides and livestock/equine medications from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. from November 3 until 14:

  • P.E.I. Agromart, located at 1804 Route 115 in Albany
  • Cavendish Agri Services, located at 19 Riverside Drive in Charlottetown
  • McCain Fertilizer, located 4763 Baldwin Road in New Perth
  • Cavendish Agri Services, located at 41 North Strreet in O’Leary
  • McCain Fertilizer, located at 168 Greenwood Drive in Summerside
  • McCain Fertilizer, located at 31 Gard Road in Bloomfield
  • Cavendish Agri Services, located at 848 Read Drive in Travellers RestThe obsolete pesticide and livestock/equine medication collection program is a national program that comes to each province on a three- year rotating basis. In between collections periods, farmers are asked to safely store their unwanted pesticides and livestock medications until they can properly dispose of them through the program.

Backgrounder

The obsolete pesticide collection program was launched by industry in 1998 as part of its commitment to the responsible lifecycle management of its products. In 2010, Cleanfarms was formed to manage several industry-funded agricultural waste management programs, including the obsolete pesticide collection program. The collection of obsolete medications for livestock and horses has been added to the obsolete collections campaign for the first time this year (2014).

What are pesticides and livestock medications?

Pesticides are registered substances regulated by Health Canada’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) that are used to control pest pressures, including fungi, insects and weeds, that can cause damage to crops.

Similar to pesticides, animal health products are regulated by Health Canada or the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. These products are used by veterinarians and animal owners to prevent, manage or treat pests and disease.

What kinds of products are collected?

All liquid and dry/granular commercially labelled pesticides. They come in various sizes and types of containers from as small as 250 ml up to 500 L totes. They may also include products in multi-walled paper and plastic bags. The products are mainly for farm use but may also include obsolete pesticides from golf courses, commercial landscape, vegetative management and structural pest control operations.

Animal health products are quite similar in the relatively wide range of products that may be included in the collection that are labelled as a livestock or equine medication. The products may come in various container sizes and types from as small as 100 ml to 20 L pails or in plastic, glass, paper/plastic bags, tubes or blister packs.

Why do obsolete products exist?

Obsolete products can result due to a number of different reasons. These may include:

  • Farmers or applicators may have saved product one year and decided to use a new product the next year;
  • A farmer may have leftover pesticides from previous years that has become de-registered and no longer legal for use;
  • Farm ownership can change leaving the new owner with leftover product on site;
  • Farmers may start growing different crops that require different pest control products than what they currently have; and
  • Pest pressures can change from when farmers first purchase products leaving them with unusable products leftover.
  • Animal health products may have exceeded their expiry date, been accidently frozen (or exposed to excessive heat) causing theproduct to be ineffective. Similarly an animal’s treatment course may have been altered / ended prematurely resulting in leftover product.

    How are obsolete products handled and destroyed after they have been returned?

    Obsolete pesticides and livestock medications returned during the collection process are safely packed in leak-proof containers and transported by a licensed and insured hazardous waste hauler. When properly packaged and handled by trained professionals, these products do not pose a health and safety risk.

    All products are safely disposed using specialized high-temperature incineration, which is the most environmentally responsible disposal option. The incineration facility that Cleanfarms normally uses is approved by Environment Canada and is located in northern Alberta. It is a world-class facility developed and built specifically for the management of hazardous waste.

    What safety measures are in place to manage potential spills?

    Cleanfarms and its licensed waste contractors have very detailed emergency response plans in place to manage any accidents or spills that may occur. Since the program began in 1998, there have not been any spills or accidents.

Saskatchewan farmers are invited to safely dispose of their obsolete pesticides and livestock medications

October 27, 2014, Saskatoon, SK – Farmers in southern Saskatchewan are being invited to safely and responsibly dispose of their unwanted or obsolete pesticides and livestock (including equine) medications from October 27-31.

Cleanfarms, an industry-led, national not-for-profit agricultural waste management organization, in partnership with the Canadian Animal Health Institute (CAHI) is offering this program, which comes at no charge to farmers, this fall.

“The Canadian Animal Health Institute’s participation in this program is just one part of our industry’s commitment to safely managing animal medications throughout their lifecycle,” said Jean Szkotnicki, President of CAHI. “Our members are happy to be able to provide Saskatchewan’s livestock and equine community with this service.”

Saskatchewan’s farmers have a long history of good stewardship practices. Since 1998, farmers in Saskatchewan have returned more than 380,000 kilograms of obsolete pesticides. The last time the program was delivered in 2012 more than 60,000 kilograms of product was collected and safely destroyed, which is a testament to Saskatchewan farmers’ commitment to being responsible stewards of the land. This year is the first time in Saskatchewan that livestock and equine medications have been added to the program.

“We are pleased that the previous collections in Saskatchewan have been huge successes,” says Barry Friesen, general manager of Cleanfarms. “The participation of Saskatchewan farmers just goes to show how committed they are to protecting the environment.”

After collection, the pesticides and medications are taken to a licensed waste management facility where they are disposed of through high temperature incineration.

The following locations will be accepting obsolete pesticides and livestock/equine medications from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. on the dates specified:

Monday, October 27, 2014

  • Cargill in Congress, 306-642-4956
  • Richardson Pioneer in Davidson, 306-567-4778
  • Blair’s Family of Companies in McLean, 306-699-2822
  • Wynard Coop Agro in Wynard, 306-554-3644

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

  • Richardson Pioneer in Lampman, 306-487-3121
  • Richardson Pioneer in Canora, 306-563-5177
  • Hillcrest Enterprises Ltd. In Coronach, 306-267-6110
  • Richardson Pioneer in Kindersley, 306-463-3399

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

  • Top Notch Farm Supply Inc. in Fillmore, 306-722-3200
  • Richardson Pioneer in Maple Creek, 306-662-2420
  • Sharpe’s Soil Services Ltd. In Moosomin, 306-435-3319
  • Crop Production Services in Shaunavon, 306-297-4121

Thursday, October 30, 2014

  • Ren Gro Fertilizer Ltd. In Milestone, 306-436-4330
  • Crop Production Services in Oxbow, 306-483-2908
  • Blair’s Family of Companies in Strongfield, 306-857-2225
  • Richardson Pioneer in Swift Current, 306-778-1616

Friday, October 31, 2014

  • Innova Ag Solutions Inc. in Central Butte, 306-796-2102
  • Future Four Agro Inc. in Macoun, 306-634-9320
  • Prairie Plains Ago Ltd. In Moose Jaw, 306-692-1661
  • Crop Protection Services in Regina, 306-757-3501The obsolete pesticide and livestock/equine medication collection program is a national program that comes to each province on a three- year rotating basis. In between collections periods, farmers are asked to safely store their unwanted pesticides and livestock medications until they can properly dispose of them through the program.

Obsolete pesticide and livestock/equine medications collection coming to Prince Edward Island

CHARLOTTETOWN, Oct. 21, 2014 /CNW/ – Farmers in P.E.I. are invited to turn in their obsolete or unwanted agricultural pesticides and livestock/equine medications from November 3 to the 14 for safe disposal.

Collection sites will be open from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. Photographers and reporters are welcome to visit the drop off locations:

  • P.E.I. Agromart, located at 1804 Route 115 in Albany
  • Cavendish Agri Services, located at 19 Riverside Drive in Charlottetown
  • McCain Fertilizer, located 4763 Baldwin Road in New Perth
  • Cavendish Agri Services, located at 41 North Strreet in O’Leary
  • McCain Fertilizer, located at 168 Greenwood Drive in Summerside
  • McCain Fertilizer, located at 31 Gard Road in Bloomfield
  • Cavendish Agri Services, located at 848 Read Drive in Travellers RestCleanfarms, a national, industry-led agricultural waste stewardship organization, has partnered with CropLife Canada and the Canadian Animal Health Institute (CAHI) to deliver this program to P.E.I. farmers. It is the plant science and animal health industries’ commitment to safely and responsibly collect and dispose of obsolete pesticides and livestock/equine medications at no cost to farmers.For more information, visit www.cleanfarms.ca or call 1-877-622-4460.

Farmers in British Columbia are invited to safely dispose of their obsolete pesticides and livestock medications

October 15, 2014, Vancouver, BC – Farmers from Vancouver Island and Fraser Valley are invited to safely and responsibly dispose of their unwanted or obsolete pesticides and livestock (including equine) medications from October 15-23.

Cleanfarms, an industry-led, national not-for-profit agricultural waste management organization, in partnership with the Canadian Animal Health Institute (CAHI), is offering this program, which comes at no charge to farmers, this fall.

“We are pleased with the past success of our collection programs in this province,” says Barry Friesen, general manager of Cleanfarms. “B.C. farmers’ enthusiasm about this program shows their continual commitment to protecting the environment and making responsible decisions on the farm.”

Farmers in British Columbia have a long history of good stewardship practices. Since 1998, B.C. farmers have turned in more than 207,000 kilograms of obsolete pesticides. This year is the first time in B.C. that livestock and equine medications have been added to the program.

“The British Columbia Agriculture Council (BCAC) appreciates that through an industry led program, B.C. farmers can safely return unused products,” said Stan Vander Waal, BCAC Board Chair. “A clean and sustainable environment is critical for the long-term future of farming.”

After collection, the pesticides and medications are taken to a licensed waste management facility where they are disposed of through high temperature incineration.

The following locations will be accepting obsolete pesticides and livestock/equine medications from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. on the dates specified:

  • October 15: Vantreight Farms in Saanich at 8277 Central Saanich Road
  • October 16: Bings Creek Recycling Centre in Duncan at 3900 Drinkwater Road
  • October 17: Comox Valley Waste Management Centre in Cumberland at 2400 Bevan Road
  • October 20-21: Direct Solutions in Delta at 7430 Hopcott Road
  • October 22-23: Univar Canada in Abbotsford at 3256 McCallum Road

The obsolete pesticide and livestock/equine medication collection program is a national program that comes to each province on a three- year rotating basis. In between collections periods, farmers are asked to safely store their unwanted pesticides and livestock medications until they can properly dispose of them through the program.

Obsolete pesticide and livestock/equine medications collection coming to Saskatchewan

October 14, 2014 – Farmers in Saskatchewan are invited to turn in their obsolete or unwanted agricultural pesticides and livestock/equine medications on the dates and at the locations specified below for safe disposal.

Collection sites will be open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the dates specified. Photographers and reporters are welcome to visit the drop off locations:

Monday, October 27, 2014

  • Cargill in Congress, 306-642-4956
  • Richardson Pioneer in Davidson, 306-567-4778
  • Blair’s Family of Companies in McLean, 306-699-2822
  • Wynard Coop Agro in Wynard, 306-554-3644Tuesday, October 28, 2014
  • Richardson Pioneer in Canora, 306-563-5177
  • Hillcrest Enterprises Ltd. in Coronach, 306-267-6110
  • Richardson Pioneer in Kindersley, 306-463-3399Wednesday, October 29, 2014
  • Top Notch Farm Supply Inc. in Fillmore, 306-722-3200
  • Richardson Pioneer in Maple Creek, 306-662-2420
  • Sharpe’s Soil Services Ltd. in Moosomin, 306-435-3319
  • Crop Protection Services in Shaunavon, 306-297-4121Thursday, October 30, 2014
  • Ren Gro Fertilizer Ltd. in Milestone, 306-436-4330
  • Crop Production Services in Oxbow, 306-483-2908
  • Blair’s Family of Companies in Strongfield, 306-857-2225
  • Richardson Pioneer in Swift Current, 306-778-1616Friday, October 31, 2014
  • Innova Ag Solutions Inc. in Central Butte, 306-796-2102
  • Future Four Agro Inc. in Macoun, 306-634-9320
  • Prairie Plains Ago Ltd. in Moose Jaw, 306-692-1661
  • Crop Protection Services in Regina, 306-757-3501Cleanfarms, a national, industry-led agricultural waste stewardship organization, has partnered with CropLife Canada and the Canadian Animal Health Institute (CAHI) to deliver this program to Saskatchewan farmers. It is the plant science, and animal health industries’ commitment to safely and responsibly collect and dispose of obsolete pesticides and livestock/equine medications at no cost to farmers.For more information, visit www.cleanfarms.ca or call 1-877-622-4460.

Obsolete pesticide and livestock/equine medications collection coming to British Columbia

October 1, 2014 – Farmers in B.C. are invited to turn in their obsolete or unwanted agricultural pesticides and livestock/equine medications on the dates and at the locations specified below for safe disposal.

Collection sites will be open on the days specified from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Photographers and reporters are welcome to visit the drop off locations:

  • October 15: Vantreight Farms in Saanichton at 8277 Central Saanich Road
  • October 16: Bings Creek Solid Waste Management Complex in Duncan at 3900 Drinkwater Road
  • October 17: Comox Valley Waste Management Centre in Cumberland at 2400 Bevan Road
  • October 20-12: Direct Solutions in Delta at 7430 Hopcott Road
  • October 22-23: Univar Canada Ltd. in Abbotsford at 3256 McCallum Road

Cleanfarms, a national, industry-led agricultural waste stewardship organization, has partnered with CropLife Canada and the Canadian Animal Health Institute (CAHI) to deliver this program to B.C. farmers. It is the plant science, and animal health industries’ commitment to safely and responsibly collect and dispose of obsolete pesticides and livestock/equine medications at no cost to farmers.

For more information, visit www.cleanfarms.ca or call 1-877-622-4460.

Quebec farmers are invited to safely dispose of their obsolete pesticides and animal medications

Saint-Bruno-de-Montarville, QC, Sept. 30, 2014 – Farmers in Quebec are being invited to safely and responsibly dispose of their unwanted or obsolete pesticides and livestock (including equine) medications from September 30 to October 11.

Cleanfarms, an industry-led, national not-for-profit agricultural waste management organization, in partnership with the Canadian Animal Health Institute (CAHI) is offering the program, which comes at no charge to farmers, this fall.

“The Canadian Animal Health Institute’s participation in this program is just one part of our industry’s commitment to safely managing animal medications throughout their lifecycle,” said Jean Szkotnicki, President of CAHI. “Our members are happy to be able to provide Saskatchewan’s livestock and equine community with this service.”

Quebec farmers have a long history of good stewardship practices. Last year, Cleanfarms partnered with L’Union des producteurs agricoles (UPA) to offer a province-wide collection program at 11 ag-retail locations. In total, 51,047 kilograms of obsolete pesticides were collected and safely disposed of during the campaign.

“This program offers a concrete solution for safe disposal of products that could otherwise be harmful to the environment. In this sense, it satisfies a real need and will, over time, become an almost-essential service,” said Marcel Groleau, president of “‘Union des producteurs agricoles (UPA). “Once again, the Union is proud to be associated with the obsolete collections campaign and welcomes agricultural producers to do their part for the environment through participating, in large numbers, in this provincial campaign.”

After collection, the pesticides are taken to a licensed waste management facility where they are disposed of through high temperature incineration.

The following locations will be accepting obsolete pesticides and livestock/equine medications from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m.:

Abitibi/Outaouais

  • Thurso, September 30, October 1-2 La Coop Agrodor
  • Ville-Marie, September 30, October 1-2La Coop Van Nord

Amos, September 30, October 1-2 La Coop Val Nord Bas Saint-Laurent/Gaspesie

  • Amqui, September 30, October 1-2: La Coop Matapedienne
  • Sanit-Philippe-de-Neri, October 9: DynacoCapitale-National/Mauricie
  • Saint-Casimir, October 3: La Coop Univert
  • St.Augustin-de-Desmaures, October 7 Synagri
  • Saint-Hyacinthe, September 30 La Coop Comax
  • Napierville, October 2 La Coop Uniforce
  • Granby, October 8 La Coop Monteregienne
  • Saint-Clet, October 9 Synagri
  • St-Remi, October 9 AgroCentre St-Remi

Lanaudiere

  • St-Thomas-de-Joliette, October 1 AgroCentre Lanaudiere
  • Mirabel, October 8 Meunerie, MondouCentre-du-Quebec/Chaudiere/Estrie
  • Saint-Narcisse-de-Beaurivage, October 8 La Coop Seigneurie
  • Victoriaville, October 2 La Coop des Bois Franc
  • Coaticook, October 7 Centre Vegetal Coop de L’estrieSaguenay
  • Normandin, September 30-October 2, October 7 La Coop des Deux Rives
  • Saint-Bruno-Lac-Saint-Jean, October 7 SynagriPomiculture

Rougemont, September 9-11 Centre Agricole Bienvenue

The obsolete collection program is a national program that comes to each province on a three-year rotating basis. In between collection periods, farmers are asked to safely store their unwanted pesticides and livestock medications until they can properly dispose of them through the program.

Backgrounder

The obsolete pesticide collection program was launched by industry in 1998 as part of its commitment to the responsible lifecycle management of its products. In 2010, CleanFARMS was formed to manage several industry-funded agricultural waste management programs, including the obsolete pesticide collection program. The collection of obsolete medications for livestock and horses has been added to the obsolete collections campaign for the first time this year (2014).

What are pesticides and livestock medications?

Pesticides are registered substances regulated by Health Canada’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) that are used to control pest pressures, including fungi, insects and weeds, that can cause damage to crops.

Similar to pesticides, animal health products are regulated by Health Canada or the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. These products are used by veterinarians and animal owners to prevent, manage or treat pests and disease.

What kinds of products are collected?

All liquid and dry/granular commercially labelled pesticides. They come in various sizes and types of containers from as small as 250 ml up to 500 L totes. They may also include products in multi-walled paper and plastic bags. The products are mainly for farm use but may also include obsolete pesticides from golf courses, commercial landscape, vegetative management and structural pest control operations.

Animal health products are quite similar in the relatively wide range of products that may be included in the collection that are labelled as a livestock or equine medication. The products may come in various container sizes and types from as small as 100 ml to 20 L pails or in plastic, glass, paper/plastic bags, tubes or blister packs.

Why do obsolete products exist?

Obsolete products can result due to a number of different reasons. These may include:

  • Farmers or applicators may have saved product one year and decided to use a new product the next year;
  • A farmer may have leftover pesticides from previous years that has become de-registered and no longer legal for use;
  • Farm ownership can change leaving the new owner with leftover product on site;
  • Farmers may start growing different crops that require different pest control products than what they currently have; and
  • Pest pressures can change from when farmers first purchase products leaving them with unusable products leftover.
  • Animal health products may have exceeded their expiry date, been accidently frozen (or exposed to excessive heat) causing theproduct to be ineffective. Similarly an animal’s treatment course may have been altered / ended prematurely resulting in leftover product.

How are obsolete products handled and destroyed after they have been returned?

Obsolete pesticides and livestock medications returned during the collection process are safely packed in leak-proof containers and transported by a licensed and insured hazardous waste hauler. When properly packaged and handled by trained professionals, these products do not pose a health and safety risk.

All products are safely disposed using specialized high-temperature incineration, which is the most environmentally responsible disposal option. The incineration facility that Cleanfarms normally uses is approved by Environment Canada and is located in northern Alberta. It is a world-class facility developed and built specifically for the management of hazardous waste.

What safety measures are in place to manage potential spills?

Cleanfarms and its licensed waste contractors have very detailed emergency response plans in place to manage any accidents or spills that may occur. Since the program began in 1998, there have not been any spills or accidents.

Backgrounder

The obsolete pesticide collection program was launched by industry in 1998 as part of its commitment to the responsible lifecycle management of its products. In 2010, Cleanfarms was formed to manage industry-funded agricultural waste management programs, including the obsolete pesticide collection program.

What are pesticides?

Pesticides are substances registered by Health Canada’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) that are used to control pest pressures, including fungi, insects and weeds, that can cause damage to crops.

What kinds of products are collected?

We collect all liquid and dry granular commercially labeled pesticides. They come in all sizes and types of containers from as small as 250 millilitres up to 500 litre totes. They can also include products delivered in multi-walled paper and plastic bags. The products are mainly for farm use but may also include obsolete pesticides from golf courses, commercial landscape operations and structural pest control.

Why do obsolete pesticides exist?

Farmers and applicators can generate obsolete pesticides for a number of different reasons, including:

  • They may have saved product one year and decided to use a new product the next year;
  • A farmer may have leftover pesticides from previous years that has become de-registered and no longer legal for use;
  • Farm ownership can change leaving the new owner with leftover product on site;
  • Farmers may start growing different crops that require different pest control products than what they currently have; and
  • Pest pressures can change from when farmers first purchase products leaving them with unusable products leftover.
  • How are obsolete products handled and destroyed after they have been returned?All products are safely disposed using specialized high-temperature incineration, which is the most environmentally responsible disposal option. The incineration facility that Cleanfarms normally uses is approved by Environment Canada and is located in northern Alberta. It is a world-class facility developed and built specifically for the management of hazardous waste.

Obsolete pesticides returned during the collection process are safely packed in leak-proof containers and transported by a licensed and insured hazardous waste hauler. When properly packaged and handled by trained professionals, these products do not pose a health and safety risk.

What safety measures are in place to manage potential spills?

Cleanfarms and its contractors have very detailed emergency response plans in place to manage any accidents or spills that may occur. Since the program began in 1998, there have not been any spills or accidents.

For further information:

Christine Lajuenesse, agr., AgriRÉCUP (450) 482-0756 | lajeunessec@agrirecup.ca

Cleanfarms’ empty seed and pesticide program has returned to Ontario

July 3, 2014, Etobicoke, ON – A clean and healthy environment is the key to agricultural success. Cleanfarms recognizes this and is working with Ontario farmers to find solutions for disposing of various on-farm waste. To that end, the agricultural waste recycler has established a pilot program for the disposal of empty seed and pesticide bags for farmers in southwestern Ontario.

The empty seed and pesticide bag pilot program, which began in May and will end in September, offers Ontario farmers a more environmentally friendly disposal solution for these bags which ensures agricultural waste is managed responsibly and stays out of landfills.

“We have conducted several waste studies to determine what type of on-farm, inorganic waste is still being sent to landfills,” says Barry Friesen, general manager of Cleanfarms. “New opportunities and alternative solutions are being explored because of these studies.”

Collection bags can be picked up from select agricultural retailers across southwestern Ontario. Before returning them, we ask farmers to ensure their seed and pesticide bags are empty and tied. All bags will be accepted, free of charge, and collected by Cleanfarms, where they will be transported to a disposal facility that recovers thermal energy and coverts it into electricity and steam for use within our community.

Farmers may return empty pesticide bags, including multi-walled paper, plastic and aluminum. Multi-walled paper and polywoven plastic empty seed bags are also accepted.

Collection sites are located at select retailers across southwestern Ontario. Attached is a list of participating retail collection sites, which can also be found at Cleanfarms.ca.

Funding for this pilot program is provided by CropLife Canada, the Canadian Seed Trade Association, and the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food and Ministry of Rural Affairs through the Canada-Ontario Agreement Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem.